• From "Our Voice, Notre Voix" No. 64 June/Juin 2017 (Viewpoints of the Psychiatrized since 1987). "Surrounding me, I was discerning that one of the basic doings of people was to gather around a shared belief, interest or concern. Whether, this was around a religious, political, social or cultural conviction--human beings need to associate with other like-minded people in order to thrive and survive. This has its advantages, but one of its downsides was that it discourages most from making the effort to think for themselves rather than allowing others to do it for them. 'I will allow others to prove the belief, and I will go on believing whatever the masses tell me to believe,' so to speak. To our detriment; and like dumb sheep going to the slaughterhouse, we often times follow the crowd without questioning anything." --Eugène LeBlanc This is not our natural, creative, expressive state. Children are naturally curious and inquisitive about the world around them. Our educational system deliberately shuts down our freedom of thought because we can no longer think what we want to think when we want to think it. In school, it has been determined what is going to be thought about and when it will be thought about. We are taught to think "inside the box" from the beginning. Above all, we learn never to question this training, but to be grateful for the privilege of receiving any "education." The band Pink Floyd, in their song "Another Brick in the Wall," is one of the few to speak out against the coercive method of teaching that mainly teaches how to bully--the same bullying children are told not to practice themselves. Threats, put-downs, angry shouting, and physical punishment (as permitted by the state in some places) are all modeled by adults in educational settings, often in front of entire groups of students. This "thinking inside the box" prepares us to accept, without question, the "ism" paradigm. From our schooling experience, it is easy to become trapped in peer-influenced, oppressive and especially discriminatory attitudes or beliefs (isms). group·think ˈɡro͞opˌTHiNGk/ noun NORTH AMERICAN noun: groupthink; noun: group-think the practice of thinking or making decisions as a group in a way that discourages creativity or individual responsibility.  

    Posted on May 18, 2017 11:18 pm
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  • Source: BBC’s HardTalk–Philosopher and Writer Pascal Bruckner, April 18, 2017: Stephen Sackur talks to writer Pascal Bruckner and asks, is something rotten in the Republic of France? Is France living through an age of decline? Stephen Sacker: "But you also seem to question the very notion that in France today there is a worrying strain of Islamaphobia. ... Do you deny that is a problem?" Pascal Bruckner: "Yes, I totally deny it and I'm going to tell you why..."    [ ... ] Stephen Sackur: "Let me quote you perhaps a significant voice around the world, that is the UN Secretary General, who just the other week said, 'One of the things that fuels terrorism is the expression in some parts of the world of Islamophobic feelings and Islamophobic policies, and Islamophobic hate speech.' He has no doubt that there's such a thing as Islamophobia." Pascal Bruckner: "Yes, I knew this quote and I think it puts everything upside down. Why has Islamaphobia started at the first step? Because there were all those terror attacks during the last 20 years. The terrorists have generated hatred of their own religion. They have generated Islamaphobia, the hatred of Islam..." People who know little or nothing about Islam have no reason to fear it. They may fear Muslims who are committing violent acts as well as fear the Islamism that motivates those acts, but they have no reason to "fear Islam." The Muslims who fear Islam know the Arabic language and something of Prophet Muhammed's life and the times he lived in. Fear of Islam--Islamophobia--does exist among Muslims, but to accuse "non-Muslims" of it only confuses the issue. And, the issue is Muslims' fear of Islam.

    Posted on May 15, 2017 10:01 pm
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  • "The problem with Islam is Islamism..." -Pascal Bruckner Source: BBC's HardTalk--Philosopher and Writer Pascal Bruckner, April 18, 2017: Stephen Sackur talks to writer Pascal Bruckner and asks, is something rotten in the Republic of France? Is France living through an age of decline? Stephen Sacker: "...I do now want to put to you something that I find quite shocking and that is in your recent writing about the state of France today, you've said that for you one of the two biggest dangers and challenges facing the French Republic today is political Islam. Islamism. Are you serious about that?" Pascal Bruckner: "Yes, I'm very serious..." Definition of ism  : a distinctive doctrine, cause, or theory  : an oppressive and especially discriminatory attitude or belief <we all have got to come to grips with our isms — Joycelyn Elders> Source: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/ism My book and blog are "not about Islam" because there is no need to write a book about Islam which is why Prophet Muhammed never wrote one. The "clear signs" he left for people to follow were so clear any book would have only muddied the waters as have all the books written since his time. These scholarly works have brought about Islamism, and Muslims defend it so vociferously because they have been told all their lives that Islamism, an ideology bearing no resemblance to Islam, is Islam. Pascal Bruckner objects to the term Islamaphobia and how it is used. However, it is a perfect description of the fear of Islam gripping the Muslim community because of the threat Islam poses to the rigid, inflexible Islamist doctrines they were born and raised with and so vehemently defend.  

    Posted on May 8, 2017 10:23 pm
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  • This post is inspired by an April 18, 2017 interview on BBC's HardTalk. Stephen Sackur and Pascal Bruckner are discussing political Islam, or Islamism, and its role in the Islamic extremism that supports terrorism. During the discussion Stephan Sackur talks about the view of Olivier Roy, an intellectual who does not think the root of the problem is Islamism and that we are dealing with psychosis. Pascal Bruckner disagrees with Roy's analysis of the root of the problem. After raising children in the Muslim community, I agree with Pascal Bruckner that the problem IS Islamism. However, I wholeheartedly agree with Roy's use of the word psychosis to describe what we are dealing with. Stephen Sackur: "...Olivier Roy, who has written and studied extensively on Islamist extremism in France, he says, look, at root the problem here is a sort of cultist ideology amongst young people, nihilistic ideology, which then finds an expression through Islam but Islamism isn't the root of their psychosis. Do you understand what he's saying?" Pascal Bruckner: "Yes, but I totally disagree with him. I'm not the only one, like Gilles Kepel, who in my eyes is a real specialist of Islam because he speaks Arabics and he makes enquiries..." Stephen Sackur: "So does Olivier Roy. He's just studied 100 case studies in France of young men who were radicalised and took on violent acts. He's studied their lives and their beliefs and this is his conclusion." Pascal Bruckner: "But Olivier Roy doesn't know the Arabic world. He's a specialist of Central Asia, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Iran. He's not very familiar with the Arabic world, he doesn't speak the language. Gilles Kepel is more aware of the real situation, more aware of the risk." In the interview, they go on to debate the controversy of the term "islamophobia." What Bruckner specifically disagrees with is the use of the term Islamaphobia as it blends two very real issues into one wrongdoing. Pascal Bruckner: "...Why has Islamaphobia started at the first step? Because there were all those terror attacks during the last 20 years. The terrorists have generated hatred of their own religion..." They have generated hatred of their own religion because they hate it. They hate it because of the way they were taught it--with coercion. Coerced, unending, boring repetition, forced memorization of the Qu'ran, constant abuse to reinforce memorization (withholding food, or privilege, sleep deprivation, beatings). At a very young age these children are forced to participate, same as adults, in extreme disruption of basic needs (sleep, nourishment, basic freedoms) with mandatory early morning and late night prayers in the name of this religion. Olivier Roy correctly describes the results as psychosis. He's just off about the root of the problem. The psychosis is a direct result of the abusive indoctrination of a religion which could never be accurately called "Islam." Psychosis is defined as a severe mental disorder in which thought and emotion are so impaired that contact is lost with external reality. The mind control exercised in the Muslim community is so extreme it influences those not even raised within it. This upbringing may not produce a terrorist in every case, but it will produce a psychotic individual that can influence others with their ideas. Along with the coercive, abusive practices used to indoctrinate children is an ideology that cannot be questioned, and since the abuse is part of that ideology, it can never be spoken of; hence, the psychosis: a result of abuse and the silencing of that abuse. The loss of contact with external reality is seen in the Muslims' firm belief that they are the only believers in One True God left in the world, and the belief that they are better than everyone else when actually they are exactly the same with exactly the same problems as everyone else, only they cannot speak of them ever to anyone, or they will be offending God and His Prophet. *psychosis: a severe mental disorder in which thought and emotions are so impaired that contact is lost with external reality. psychosis definition BBC's HardTalk Interview transcript can be found here: https://subsaga.com/bbc/news/hardtalk/2017/04/18/pascal-bruckner-philosopher-and-writer.html

    Posted on May 1, 2017 10:50 pm
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